Browsing Tag

gut-health

Lunch + Dinner Recipes

Crispy Lemony Tempeh Baked Lemony Tempeh

28th May 2020

Do you love tempeh? If not, you have to try it this way – it will change your mind (your world in fact).

Slice you’re tempeh into ‘fishfinger sized’ pieces.

Then transfer them to a baking sheet, next drizzle with a bit of avocado oil, soy sauce, lemon juice and sprinkle with nutritional yeast and sea salt, then give them a shake so that the ‘marinade’ anoints all sides of your pieces and pop them in a 180degree Celsius pre-heated oven for 15 minutes.

Warming: Addictive!

 

 

Lunch + Dinner Recipes

Spiritfest Cauli, Pea & Tempheh Coconut ‘Mess’ JOYFUL RETREAT FOOD

13th November 2019

This year is speeding to an end, and inevitably one starts looking forward to cool things happening in the year ahead…. 2020.

I am so looking forward yo my Joyful Retreat next year as well as SPIRITFEST at our beautiful guest farm; Somerset Gift.

So in anticipation of a awesome 2020 ahead, I am sharing this recipe for a ‘delicious plant-based mess’  – one of the dishes I will be serving for supper at my SpiritFest food-stall – yes! I am excited to be one of the food vendors. Book your tickets here; Spritfest website.

Im delighted to share this yummy and nourishing recipe with you guys which features on of my most favourite and delicious plant based proteins; Tempheh from Tabu Foods

Without further ado, here is this ridiculously easy vegetable and Tempheh ‘mess’ recipe…because ‘the magic is in the mess”.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of frozen BABY peas
  • 200g of tempheh, sliced into cubes
  • 1 head of coailflower, cut into small florets
  • 1 cup of coconut cream
  • 1 cup of spinach
  • 2 bunches of spring onions, finely sliced
  • herbs & spices: 1 heaped teaspoon of turmeric, 1 teaspoon of paprika, 1 /2 teaspoon of sumac, 1 teaspoon of coriander, 1 teaspoon of dried thyme
  • 1 tablespoon of coconut oil
  • sea salt & cayenne pepper to taste

Now simply sautés the spring onion, cauliflower, spinach & tempheh in a large and deep saucepan for about 15 minutes on low heat, seasoning with salt

Next add the coconut cream and all the herbs, spices and frozen peas, season with salt and allow simmering for 15-20 minutes on low heat before serving.

Viola, its as easy as that.

Hoping to see you at Spiritfest, and in the meantime I wish you an abundance radiant health and happiness

Marlien xx

 

 

 

Lunch + Dinner Recipes

New Year’s Lentil & Potato Bake Plant-Based Gut Healthy Meals

1st January 2019

This recipe was inspired by my friend Monica after she described this yummy lentil & potato bake she makes….I still intend to get her recipe (and hopefully share it with you guys) but for now here is my version:

Ingredients:

  • organic waxy potatoes, scrubbed, pealed and then sliced thinly
  • overnight soaked brown lentils (rinse them well of the soaking water, and then par-cook them in a salted water)
  • 1 x tin of tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoon of ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon of allspice
  • 2 cloves of fresh garlic, grated or crush
  • 1/4 cup of sun-dried onion flakes
  • 1 kallo vegetable stock cube
  • 1 cup of water

Method:

  • once the lentils are par cooked (half cooked), add them to a large cast iron saucepan, or pot, then sauté them along with a drizzle of macadamia oil along with the garlic and spices, for about 5 minutes.
  • Next add the chopped tomatoes, crumbled stock cube, water, salt to taste and sun-dried onions and allow this mixture to simmer for 30 min (without the lid) on low heat.
  • Then add the sliced potatoes on top of this lentil ‘stew’ in a more or less single, but overlapping layer, add a bit of salt and pepper to taste and pop it in a pre-heated oven for another 30 min.
  • Serve with a salad and some greens of your choice.

Happy cooking and wishing you radiant health ahead in 2019

Wellness + Nutrition

How Omega 3 helps heal your Gut! Gut Health & Omega 3

18th November 2018

Featured meal idea: Poached wild caught Norwegian salmon, served with avocado, and mixed baby leaves, dressed simply with lemon juice, cold pressed olive oil and lots of sea salt & black pepper, so delicious and nutritious:

Time savers tip; poach a large fillet of salmon and then store it in the fridge to supply 2-3 of these filling salads for your lunchbox or summery suppers for the week.

In addition to this simple salad idea, some really interesting information in the below article about the role of Omega 3 in your gut health from Medical News Today:

Omega 3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids, which means that although we need them to stay healthy, the human body cannot produce them on its own – so we have to get them from food.

The benefits of a diet rich in omega-3s are well known. The fatty acids seem to lower the “bad” kind of cholesterol, lower high blood pressure, and improve overall cardiovascular health.

Some studies have also suggested that omega-3 can reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritisand improve bone strength, as well as protect against age-related cognitive decline and dementia.

And now, researchers from the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine, in collaboration with scientists from King’s College London – both in the United Kingdom – add to the long list of omega-3’s benefits.

The new study – led by Dr. Ana Valdes, an associate professor and reader at the University of Nottingham – suggests that the compound can improve the biodiversity of the gut.

How omega-3 may improve gut health

The researchers analyzed levels of DHA, which is a type of omega-3 fatty acid, as well as total omega-3 serum levels and microbiome data from 876 twins.

“This cohort of 876 volunteer women had previously been used to investigate the human genetic contribution to the gut microbiome in relation to weight gain and disease,” says Dr. Valdes.

Dr. Valdes summarizes the findings, saying, “We […] found [that omega-3 intake], together with […] serum levels of omega-3, were strongly associated with the diversity and number of species of healthy bacteria in the gut.”

The association was independent of whether or not the participants also had a diet rich in fiber.

First study author Dr. Cristina Menni, of King’s College London, adds, “We also found that specific bacteria that have been linked to lower inflammation and lower risk of obesity are increased in people who have a higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids.”

In an attempt to understand the mechanism behind this association, the researchers performed further tests and found that “high levels of omega-3 in blood […] correlated with high levels of a compound called N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) in the gut.”

[NCG] has been shown in animals to reduce oxidative stress in the gut. We believe that some of the good effects of omega-3 in the gut may be due to the fact that omega-3 induces bacteria to produce this substance.”

Dr. Cristina Menni

“Our study is the largest to date to examine the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and the composition of the gut microbiome,” says Dr. Valdes.

For the full article, navigate to the link below:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319375.php