Crushes + Product Reviews, Wellness + Nutrition

Frozen versus Fresh Soga Frozen Juice

7th April 2019

Did you know that buying from frozen means you are getting a far superior product?

If you get most of your produce from a supermarket, you may be short-changing you’re nutrition when you skip the freezer cases. Frozen produce can be equal, or superior, in terms of nutrient value, quality, shelf-life and cost. Fresh-picked vegetables and fruits straight from the farm or your own garden are of the highest quality, but when you’re shopping at the supermarket — choose a mix of fresh and frozen to maximize your nutrition intake.

In a nutshell, many produce for the fresh market are picked before they are perfectly ripe, and as a result have not reached its optimal nutritional value yet.

I am discovering some lovely products in the frozen section, one of which is SOGA organic citrus. Their range of products include Orange Juice, Grapefruit Juice, Orange Juice lollies as well as lemon juices that come in handy sachets for single use. This means no wastage and all their products are just ‘squeezed and freezed”, as well as being from certified organic origin.

As winter approaches Soga juices are a wonderful way of adding bioavailable Vitamin C to your diet. You can find a SOGA freezer in your local SPAR and in most other supermarkets too, if not approach the manager and ask them to start stocking it. #YUMYUM

 

 

 

Wellness + Nutrition

Yoga Kitchen Workshops 2019 Yoga Kitchen Nutrition Workshops

28th January 2019

Are you tired all the time, do you struggle to lose weight and feel that you would like to invest in looking and feeling your best? Join one of my workshops this year to learn how and what to eat – and how enjoy the journey to your best health!

Announcing all my workshop dates for 2019, covering subjects like How to eat for natural and effortless weight loss and which foods & supplements to include for beautiful skin & boundless energy!

For dates & more info navigate to my events page http://www.yogakitchen.co.za/the-yoga-kitchens-events/

Lunch + Dinner Recipes

New Year’s Lentil & Potato Bake Plant-Based Gut Healthy Meals

1st January 2019

This recipe was inspired by my friend Monica after she described this yummy lentil & potato bake she makes….I still intend to get her recipe (and hopefully share it with you guys) but for now here is my version:

Ingredients:

  • organic waxy potatoes, scrubbed, pealed and then sliced thinly
  • overnight soaked brown lentils (rinse them well of the soaking water, and then par-cook them in a salted water)
  • 1 x tin of tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoon of ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon of allspice
  • 2 cloves of fresh garlic, grated or crush
  • 1/4 cup of sun-dried onion flakes
  • 1 kallo vegetable stock cube
  • 1 cup of water

Method:

  • once the lentils are par cooked (half cooked), add them to a large cast iron saucepan, or pot, then sauté them along with a drizzle of macadamia oil along with the garlic and spices, for about 5 minutes.
  • Next add the chopped tomatoes, crumbled stock cube, water, salt to taste and sun-dried onions and allow this mixture to simmer for 30 min (without the lid) on low heat.
  • Then add the sliced potatoes on top of this lentil ‘stew’ in a more or less single, but overlapping layer, add a bit of salt and pepper to taste and pop it in a pre-heated oven for another 30 min.
  • Serve with a salad and some greens of your choice.

Happy cooking and wishing you radiant health ahead in 2019

Wellness + Nutrition

How Omega 3 helps heal your Gut! Gut Health & Omega 3

18th November 2018

Featured meal idea: Poached wild caught Norwegian salmon, served with avocado, and mixed baby leaves, dressed simply with lemon juice, cold pressed olive oil and lots of sea salt & black pepper, so delicious and nutritious:

Time savers tip; poach a large fillet of salmon and then store it in the fridge to supply 2-3 of these filling salads for your lunchbox or summery suppers for the week.

In addition to this simple salad idea, some really interesting information in the below article about the role of Omega 3 in your gut health from Medical News Today:

Omega 3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids, which means that although we need them to stay healthy, the human body cannot produce them on its own – so we have to get them from food.

The benefits of a diet rich in omega-3s are well known. The fatty acids seem to lower the “bad” kind of cholesterol, lower high blood pressure, and improve overall cardiovascular health.

Some studies have also suggested that omega-3 can reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritisand improve bone strength, as well as protect against age-related cognitive decline and dementia.

And now, researchers from the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine, in collaboration with scientists from King’s College London – both in the United Kingdom – add to the long list of omega-3’s benefits.

The new study – led by Dr. Ana Valdes, an associate professor and reader at the University of Nottingham – suggests that the compound can improve the biodiversity of the gut.

How omega-3 may improve gut health

The researchers analyzed levels of DHA, which is a type of omega-3 fatty acid, as well as total omega-3 serum levels and microbiome data from 876 twins.

“This cohort of 876 volunteer women had previously been used to investigate the human genetic contribution to the gut microbiome in relation to weight gain and disease,” says Dr. Valdes.

Dr. Valdes summarizes the findings, saying, “We […] found [that omega-3 intake], together with […] serum levels of omega-3, were strongly associated with the diversity and number of species of healthy bacteria in the gut.”

The association was independent of whether or not the participants also had a diet rich in fiber.

First study author Dr. Cristina Menni, of King’s College London, adds, “We also found that specific bacteria that have been linked to lower inflammation and lower risk of obesity are increased in people who have a higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids.”

In an attempt to understand the mechanism behind this association, the researchers performed further tests and found that “high levels of omega-3 in blood […] correlated with high levels of a compound called N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) in the gut.”

[NCG] has been shown in animals to reduce oxidative stress in the gut. We believe that some of the good effects of omega-3 in the gut may be due to the fact that omega-3 induces bacteria to produce this substance.”

Dr. Cristina Menni

“Our study is the largest to date to examine the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and the composition of the gut microbiome,” says Dr. Valdes.

For the full article, navigate to the link below:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319375.php